Recent Posts

U.S. House Appropriations Committee Approves Commerce-Justice-Science Funding Bill

U.S. House Appropriations Committee Approves Commerce-Justice-Science Funding Bill

Last week the House Appropriations Committee passed a Commerce-Justice-Science bill that includes funding for three programs in FY2020—the Second Chance Act, the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Act, and the Justice Reinvestment Initiative—aimed at increasing public safety and reducing recidivism at the local and state levels.

U.S. House Members Express Support for Key Justice Programs

U.S. House Members Express Support for Key Justice Programs

Congressional leaders in April took strong bipartisan action in support of three programs in FY 2020—the Second Chance Act, the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Act (MIOTCRA), and the Justice Reinvestment Initiative (JRI)—aimed at increasing public safety and reducing recidivism at the local and state levels.

Announcements

[Register for Webinar] Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: 10 Tips Law Enforcement Officers Need to Know

[Register for Webinar] Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: 10 Tips Law Enforcement Officers Need to Know

During the webinar, participants will hear from the Serving Safely: The National Initiative to Enhance Policing for Persons with Mental Illnesses and Developmental Disabilities team, which is a collaborative effort between BJA, the Vera Institute of Justice, and partners in the fields of policing, mental illness, crisis intervention, peer advocacy, emergency medicine, technology development, and prosecution.

Webinars

Innovative Programming for Veterans in the Criminal Justice System

Innovative Programming for Veterans in the Criminal Justice System

This webinar focusses on the programming developed specifically for veterans in two jurisdictions—the Middlesex County Sheriff’s Office in Massachusetts and the San Diego County Sheriff’s Department in California—and explains how these jurisdictions developed partnerships with their Veterans Affairs resources and other entities in their criminal justice systems.

Improving Cultural Competency: Working with People in the Criminal Justice System Who Have Mental Illnesses

Improving Cultural Competency: Working with People in the Criminal Justice System Who Have Mental Illnesses

This webinar provides an overview of the intersection of mental illness and the criminal justice system; describes factors contributing to the need for cultural competency as it relates to people in the criminal justice system who have mental illnesses; identifies strategies and best practices that judges, prosecutors, and defense attorneys can employ when working with people of diverse backgrounds who have mental illnesses.

2018 JMHCP Category 1 Grantee Orientation

2018 JMHCP Category 1 Grantee Orientation

In this webinar, CSG Justice Center staff explain the training and technical assistance opportunities and resources available to FY18 JMHCP grantees.

2018 JMHCP Grantee Orientation

2018 JMHCP Grantee Orientation

In this webinar, CSG Justice Center staff explain the training and technical assistance opportunities and resources available to grantees, and staff from the Bureau of Justice Assistance provide an overview of the post-award grant management requirements.

2018 Second Chance Act Orientation for Reentry for Adults with Co-Occurring Substance Abuse and Mental Illness Grant Program

2018 Second Chance Act Orientation for Reentry for Adults with Co-Occurring Substance Abuse and Mental Illness Grant Program

In this webinar, representatives from the NRRC, along with staff from BJA, provide an overview of the Second Chance Act’s Reentry for Adults with Co-Occurring Substance Abuse and Mental Illness (CSAMI) grant program and explain the training and technical assistance opportunities that are available to grantees, including the Planning & Implementation Guide, and other resources available to grantees.

Publications

In Focus: Conducting a Comprehensive Process Analysis

In Focus: Conducting a Comprehensive Process Analysis

This brief from the Stepping Up partners presents counties with steps for examining how people who have serious mental illnesses move through a county’s criminal justice and behavioral health systems, it is one of a series of companion products designed to provide counties with further guidance on how to apply the Stepping Up framework “Reducing the Number of People with Mental Illnesses in Jail: Six Questions County Leaders Need to Ask.”

Recent headlines

Sheriff Backs “Stepping Up” Program

Chambers County Sheriff Sid Lockhart said he is entirely behind the Chambers County Commission’s efforts to treat mental health needs inside the county jail.

Pitt County Jail Aims to Reduce Recidivism and Substance Use Relapse

The Pitt County department has a jail “navigator” who helps place people into safe housing and reconnect them to benefits upon their release. The sheriff’s office is also preparing to launch a new treatment program for drug users housed in the jail.

Miami County Is ‘Stepping Up’

The Miami County Jail kicked off their involvement in the Stepping Up Initiative—a national initiative to reduce the number of people with mental illnesses in jails—on June 19, joining over 45 other Ohio counties.

Q&A: A Look at the Issue of Mentally Ill Inmates in Jails

About 4 to 5% of Americans are seriously mentally ill, compared with as many as 18% of those in jails, according to Risë Haneberg, who leads the Stepping Up initiative on behalf of The Council of State Governments Justice Center.

Restorative Practices Aim to Help Jailed Youth

Knowing many of the teens have been sitting in jail cells and thinking for hours about what landed them there, Bettina Graf—restorative practices lead for the San Mateo County Office of Education—focuses on helping them separate their actions from their identities before they begin classes in the county’s court and community schools.

Study: Link between Treatment Programs and Reduced Jail, Recidivism

A five-year study by the Center for Behavioral Health and Justice at Wayne State University’s School of Social Work found that diverting individuals with mental health disorders into treatment programs rather than simply jailing them significantly reduces the jail population and reduces the chances of recidivism.